DIY Finger Knitting Loom Made Simple with TP Tube

Finger knitting is a fun craft activity you can explore with your kids, grand-kids and students


As a kid growing up, if you’ve had the pleasure of learning how to knit from your grandmother, then you were one of the very fortunate, it is one of those great bonding experiences that you’ll always remember. Not only is it a fun little activity between grandmother and grand-kids… it’s a great skill to have in your adult life.

Knitting was and is still very popular, but as with the ebbs and flows of trends, tradition sometimes gives way to technology and new spins on things that may have been seen as a dying craft. 

Finger knitting is one of those trends among kids, it requires little adult participation once the weaving gets going, and it’s flexible enough so that kids can create a variety of projects and have fun while doing it.

If you’ve ever tried to do it yourself and failed, don’t worry too much, this article with share with you a simpler and effective way to do it, so that you can implement it at your next kids party or family event.

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All you need is a TP tube, four colored popsicle sticks, a hot glue gun or regular glue, a pair of scissors and rubber bands. 

And, of course, your color changing yarn!

Let’s get started.

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1. Creating the loom 

To make the loom, get one of the popsicle sticks and glue it on the outside of your TP tube, leave about one inch of the popsicle stick at the top, over the edge of the tube. Just as a reminder if you’re using regular glue, give it a bit more time to dry.

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After you’ve done that, flip the TP tube over and glue another popsicle stick on the opposite side facing the first popsicle stick, leaving an inch at the top matching the first stick.


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With another quarter turn of the TP tube, do the same with the third and fourth popsicle sticks, always leaving one inch above. 

If you’ve done it correctly, you’ll have the four sticks positioned like a cross.

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2. Yarn holder

To create your yarn holder, take a rubber band and wrap it twice around the bottom of the tube and around the base of the popsicle sticks. The rubber bands are optional, but they do help to secure and hold the sticks in place.

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To get started, spool some yarn and take one end of the yarn and pull it through the TP tube and out the opposite opening. 

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Measure at least one or two lengths of extra yarn the length of the tube, and place the top of the yarn underneath the rubber band. Pull through about the length of the tube amount of yarn, and leave it hanging off like a tail

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3. Adding the yarn

Now it’s time for the tricky part, which is to begin by wrapping the yarn on the popsicle sticks the right way. 

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To begin, select one of the popsicle sticks and begin to wrap the very top of the stick with yarn. Starting from the left side of the peg and across the front, wrap it around once with the yarn.

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Once you’ve wrapped the first peg, following that counter-clockwise movement, place the yarn on the left side and from the back of the next peg that’s directly beside the one you’ve just completed. Wrap it around once at the front, and then move on to the next peg.


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Continue to wrap the other pegs in the same manner, starting from the left side at the back of the peg, and wrap once at the front, until all four is completed.

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This way all the pegs are wrapped in the same manner and looks like a picture frame.

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4. Weaving

Now it’s time to begin weaving, tug gently on the bit of yarn that was left dangling like a tail to loosen it up.

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Taking your weaving yarn, place it on top of the very first peg that was wrapped. 

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You will then need to pull the very first wrapping of yarn, up and over the peg and over your weaving yarn.

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Once you’ve done that, tug on the bit of yarn that was left dangling like a tail to secure the yarn in place.

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Keeping a bit of tension on the yarn, repeat the same action on the other pegs by placing the weaving yarn on top or in front of the stick, and then pull on the original wrapping yarn up and over both the stick and the new piece of yarn. 

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You’ll know you’re doing it right if it’s creating some sort of spider web pattern. You can use the tail to pull it down and tighten it up as you go along.

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Now just keep going… Up and over, up and over, as you continue to do this your weave will start to grow. Make it as long as you want it to be.

If it pops off the peg, just put it back and continue, that will happen from time to time if you do not keep the tension of the weaving yarn.

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As you continue to weave, the chain will start to come through the opening at the bottom, you can keep going until you get the desired length.

Seven or eight inches long is perfect for a bracelet if that's what you're aiming for, or keep going.

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5. Taking it off the tube

Once you have your ideal length, get your scissors and snip the yarn, leaving around 12 inches of extra yarn attached to tie it off.

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To tie it off, carefully slide the first loop off the peg and thread the extra piece of yarn through that hole and then pull.

Go to the next one, slip it off and slide the extra yarn through the loop and repeat for all the other loops.

Try to use colored yarn for the first time (those that change color throughout) and it will help you know what stitch you're on at any given moment.

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All you need to do to complete the entire process, is to pull on the extra bit of yarn on both ends to tighten it, and you got yourself a nice, long finger knitted chain.

You can create jump ropes, scarfs, bracelets and so much more. This is such a fun little craft idea for you and your students, kids or grand-kids, it’s easy to do once you understand the initial steps and the fun and excitement is endless!