How to Paint Wildflowers With Metallic Watercolors

Learn step by step how to use metallic watercolors to paint flowers


It’s always the perfect time to allow your creative imagination to run free, so why not take out those metallic watercolor paints you’ve had stored up for some time and give them a test run. 

Metallic watercolor paints are not just visually pleasing, they have the ability to add life and depth to any dull watercolor piece. They add a bit of shimmer, shine and are flexible enough to be used in various art themes, the possibilities are endless with these paints.

So if you want to get a little creative, let's get right into how you can use your metallic watercolors to create an easy wildflower bundle.

To get started you will need:

Metallic watercolors

Black watercolor paper

Small - medium paint brushes

Water container

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1.  Painting the stems

To get started, get your small paint brush and dip it in your stem color, some kind of green or brown. Ensure that your paintbrush is saturated with water and also apply a small amount of water to the paint. 

You don’t always have to begin with the stems, however, when you start that way it allows your design to grow and develop as you move upwards to the top of the paper, which is really fun.

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To begin, use the very tip of your brush to create thin strokes on the paper by dragging your paintbrush with the color upwards. Try not to make your lines too straight, instead make them appear organic by painting them slightly angled. Your lines should look like an elongated ‘C’ curve.

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As you continue to add more lines, you can connect them where one sprouts off of the other. When you’re connecting your stems make sure that the lines move up and off to the side in the growth direction, similar to a ‘V’ shape. When you paint the lines just off to the side, it will begin to look like a hard disconnect.

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You can continue to add more stems by overlapping a few, if you wish.


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2.  Adding a black-eyed Susan

Once you’re through adding the stems, try to add a bit of interest to the current composition by adding a black-eyed Susan, or the resemblance of a black-eyed Susan flower. Even though wildflowers tend not to be too bright, you can choose any color that you want for this. 

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This first flower will be your focal point and the other flowers will be a little more subdued. To begin, pick a stem or you can choose the tallest of them and dip your brush in whichever color you desire, and create two ‘C’ curves. Both ‘C’ curves should be facing and touching each other to create the look of a petal.

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You can choose to make them shorter or longer depending on the look you’re going for. Once you’re done with the first petal of the black-eyed Susan, create your center petal and add a few more petals at an angle from the center outwards and down. These petals should resemble the shape of a triangle. 

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3.  Adding the center of the black-eyed Susan

To add the center of the flower, take a small paint brush and add your color to the tip of your brush bristles. 

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To create the textured look of the center of the black-eyed Susan, take your brush and create some small quick marks or dots with the tip, directly in the center at the top of your petals.

To add a bit more depth you can add a darker color to the mix for that extra oomph. If you’re concerned about the colors bleeding, you can always wait until the other part is dry before adding your other colors.

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4.  Adding flowers to the stems

Once you’re through with the center of the flower, to add even more interest to the bundle, you can choose some other color and create some quick marks with the tip of your brush.

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To do this, use the tip of your paintbrush and simply set your brush down on the paper and this will create a kind of circular shape on the stem. Start at the top of one of your stems with one dot, followed by two dots below the first one and then three. Once you’ve done that, skip a small section on the stem and continue with one and two.

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You can play around with the amount by placing one and two marks, and then skip and continue with three and then skip, do this down the length of the stem or until you desire. 

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Doing this creates some irregularity and adds some interest to the piece, as it looks like a stem of flowers the whole way down. You can even create more interest by adding more quick marks away from the stem. This makes it look fuller and a lot like a different kind of plant, and is quite easy to do.

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5.  Adding the leaves

Once you’ve completed your stems, you can always choose to add a bit of greenery to the composition, you can’t go wrong with some leaves. This is an easy go-to and not very difficult to create, all you need is the right color on your brush. 


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To create your leaf like shapes, take your paintbrush and drag a line upwards from the top of one of your short stems. Initially apply a bit of pressure to use the full belly of the brush, and as you drag the brush upwards lift and release the pressure to create the tip.

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So the base of your leave should be thicker and wider and as you move upwards into the curve, it should be thinner and the color a bit more subtle.

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Depending on your composition you can go ahead and another leaf or two, or another stem filled with flowers, try to make it a bit off balanced when adding more as nature is not perfect. So play around with the composition and add what you think will make it more interesting to you. 

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And the final step is to look at your stems and if the one that is directly attached to your black-eyed Susan is too thin, go ahead and make it a bit thicker.

And there we have it, your wildflower bundle with metallic watercolors. You can get as creative as you want with your metallic watercolors, you can create beautiful paintings, wedding invitations, greetings cards and so much more.