Top three golf pitching techniques you should know

If you enjoy playing golf whether you're a beginner or pro, these techniques may just be perfect for you.


Many people think that playing golf is easy, but that’s not so true. While the sport may appear very straightforward, since all you have to do is hit the ball with your club and put it into a hole, there is a myriad of details that can make this exhilarating sport a frustrating experience, especially if you take these tips for granted. 

If you’re a newbie looking to get into the art of golfing or you're a pro just looking for a few tips, here are three pitching techniques that could help you master the art of golfing.

1. The Triangle Technique

The first one is a basic pitching technique, it is a very sound, tested and proven technique that even an inexperienced player can have fun with. 

For the triangle technique your body setup is very important, as it will help you to easily nail this technique, try to practice this on a 50 yard basket. You begin by aligning the clubface with your target, imagine a straight line between the target and the ball, then place your club right behind it. That’s pretty obvious, but must be done. 

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Now for the tricky part that everyone seems to forget: get your feet and your hips slightly open. That way, you preset your hips into an impact position, which is important because you don’t have time to rotate that much when you are over a short shot and this will grant you the strength necessary to cover the distance, while keeping the precision. 

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The ball should be positioned in the middle of the stance, because you don’t want to hit it too low or too high. Put your weight on your front feet, squat a little and rest your hand on the club, making sure they are ahead of the ball and opposing your left thigh. 

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This is called the Triangle Technique because you keep the shoulders, arms and hand in the shape of a triangle, swinging the club back and forth in a pendulum motion, with the arms stretched but relaxed. If you do it right, the angle of attack will be a descending motion, hitting the ball right before you hit the turf. As long as your wrists don’t flick with the impact, the result will be a consistent shot, with the help of your shoulders to keep balance of the triangle.

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This technique is great because it allows you to control the distance with precision. Another detail you must pay attention is to keep your sternum over the ball, nice and centered over the actual shot.

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There is no problem hitting the turf, actually if you do this right, it must happen. It is all about getting the swing arc into a perfect motion to hit the ball towards the target, without diverting its trajectory.

2. The Hinge and Hold Technique

This technique differs from the Triangle because you are not going to maintain the shape throughout the swing, but instead you are going to use your wrists to create a hinge that will allow a steeper angle of attack, for a stronger hit on the ball (and also, turf). If you’re able to maintain the loft on the club, you will have great backspin control.

The setup is very similar to the first one: feet and hips slightly open, putting your weight on your thighs in a little squat and keeping the hands just ahead of the ball.

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Keep the core firm, start the triangle motion and then hinge your wrists to a 90 degrees angle with the shaft of the club. Make sure to maintain that hinge throughout the swing to hit the ball with a deeper angle. That is why it is called hinge… and hold.

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Bear in mind that this technique might be a little troublesome because it involves a good strike in the ball, which can be scary in short shots. That’s why maintaining the angle is so important, and creating a lower angle of attack. You can hear if you do it right: the strike will sound crisper than the triangle technique.

3. The Linear Pitching Technique

This technique is rather different than the first two as it is all about getting the club to hit the bottom of the ball, skimming right through the ball and the turf. It is not about the hinge, nor putting the weight in the front. You want to keep your weight balanced, and you can even straighten up your stance, pairing it with the target line.

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It is easier if your feet are a little slightly open, but you can keep them square, too. Point your shaft straight up using your back until it is almost vertical, and when you descend, go for the bottom of the ball. You’ll hit the ball and turf almost simultaneously.

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This technique helps you to take out the fear factor with a sweeping motion that will skim through the ball and get massive heights to your shot. By doing it right, your  ball will rise above when compared with other techniques.

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Keep in mind that there is no “right” or “wrong” technique; the best one is the one that you feel most comfortable with, each one with its own benefit. Of course, if you master them all, you are going to be a more complete player but in the end, do what works best to put the ball into the target.

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